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    Holiday Gifts

Who Cares?! Stop It!

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Do not conform to the pattern of this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind. Then you will be able to test and approve what God’s will is–his good, pleasing and perfect will. Romans 12:2

This week Facebook has been flooded with controversy; from a certain CEO to Angelina Jolie. Why are we so caught up in this? All of this nonsense.

I won’t even name the CEO or his company. I refuse to give his comments or his sexually immoral advertisements and marketing system any more publicity. His comments were not nice but were they really all that surprising? I don’t shop there because I’m a fat girl. When I was thin I didn’t cross the threshold of that store. I don’t agree with the moral compass of this company and that’s enough to keep me out of the store.

The best thing we can do is to stop talking about him or his company. Stop handing over the mass media and the internet to this man. Don’t allow your children to shop there or wear his clothes. When their commercials come on the television, if you don’t already do this, change the channel or turn it off. Stop it!

Pray for his heart to be changed. That he would see how the sexual exploitation of young people to garner sales, is wrong. That is our very best defense.

Please reconsider sharing the video that is going around of the young man passing out the brand’s clothing to the homeless. Exploiting the homeless to make a point is wrong.

Can I ask why we are so concerned with Angelina’s breasts? Seriously. They belong to her body. She had an 87% chance of breast cancer. If my own risk were this high, I would probably do the same and it’s really no one’s business. I doubt very much that she went into it without a lot of thought and consideration. She has six children to consider. And again, it’s absolutely none of our business! Stop it!

Let’s rise above the nonsense and stop giving attention to those who don’t deserve it or need it. Stop stirring the pot.

What are your thoughts on the past week’s controversies? Does it roll off your shoulders? Or does it incense you? Share in the comments below.

Blessings,

Melsiggy

 

Photo credit: Keerati at Freedigitalphotos.net 


5 Comments

  1. Totally agree. I’m ashamed to see some of the comments from Christians circling on Facebook. I wonder if that certain CEO’s comments will impact sales. Or will teens use this as leverage to bully? I hope not. I like that you won’t mention his name or the company’s name. Good for you.

    • I’ve wondered the same thing about teens using it to bully. Perhaps his comments will have opened some dialogue between parents and their teens or even w/i the schools. Let’s hope that even the “cool” kids have their eyes opened to this company.

  2. I have to say I think it completely depends on our passion. Now some just like to bawk and squawk about everything and anything however I think if we are passionate about ‘xyz’ then we should squawk. If my passion was treatment of larger sized women then I should be squawking and letting people know the man behind comments and what it means to shop there. I boycotted Walmart for many years because of it’s use of products from slaves and child labor and mistreatment of women. I squawked about it. There was a huge impact on walmart stock for several years from a movement of people who squawked about it. I was passionate about it. Of course internet was not as well and widely used with social media during that time. My passion is domestic violence so if someone would of made a comment who owned a business about victims of abuse I probably would be squawking myself. Do I think we need to post about things to just bring chaos or controversy nah… but I do believe we should post about things that inspire our heart, feed our soul or can help cause a movement for good yes! I most certainly do. I would never want anyone to tell me to stop posting about God or businesses who rebuke Christians (like the whole chic-fil-a thing) It was something close to my heart. I do think CEO’s need to be exposed and accountable to the public for things they say however he has far more issues than his comments. I do feel that we should share things that are close to us. I have not personally shared either of those stories because even though I’m a larger woman I never shop their anyways nor do I go in that store with my children because of the moral views of the CEO outside of his comments. But for anyone passionate I think they should post away simple because we all have different passions in different places. Even when I grow tired of seeing political things I still think people should have that right to post it and that we need to be aware of political things. So all in all I think if something is passionate for that person they should post it. If they are posting it to harm others then no. But to educate yes “my people shall perish for lack of knowledge”

    • I do agree if it’s being shared to educate. I have not seen that with this particular CEO though, it’s been posted so others can bash on him and I’m not sure that’s the best thing for us to be doing. The interesting thing to me with this whole scenario is that his comments were from an interview in 2006. They just somehow resurfaced and caused a media frenzy again. It is totally okay to be passionate about something and to want to educate and another thing to want to tear someone down. I agree, totally boycott them. That’s going to hit them where it hurts. Good thoughts, Hollie 🙂 Thanks for sharing!

  3. Not only was I once in such a church, a couple years ago I encountered a consultant working with a church. The elderly members were hatching a plan to stop young people from bringing any more “modern music” into their midst.

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